Clinical Applications

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Clinical Applications, Today's Neurologist,

The Ongoing Impact of Zika Virus

The most recent Zika outbreak ended at the close of 2016. It is reasonable to assume that neurologists will be major players as the full consequences of the outbreak become clear, even though we don’t fully understand its long-term impact today. In August, the CDC published new information about the effect of Zika on children…
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Clinical Applications, Today's Neurologist,

Brain Plaques and Tangles: A Good Sign in Primary Progressive Aphasia?

Identifying differences in types of dementia can help narrow down appropriate treatment pathways. It can also avoid confusion about how to approach the different causes of similar diseases. But, as researchers out of Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine were recently reminded, commonalities can lead to important breakthroughs in care and treatment, too. Their study,…
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Clinical Applications, Today's Neurologist,

“The Gene” for Alzheimer Disease

Your patient just got some interesting news. He is 17 percent Eastern European, he probably sneezes in bright sunlight, and he has “the gene” for Alzheimer Disease. That’s right, your patient just had genetic testing done by a company like 23andMe. The biotech firm lets its customers send in a saliva sample to have DNA…
Clinical Applications, Today's Neurologist,

Choosing Wisely® for Epilepsy Patients

With the ever-present risk of seizure looming, decision-making can be difficult for patients with epilepsy. Balancing risks and rewards can be tricky in all aspects of their lives. So it’s natural that you want to remove any uncertainty about treatment that you can, helping them maintain as much control over this aspect of their lives…
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Doctor testing eye movement